Cruise Cruise versus boost versus afterburner. Oh my!

I have a few questions on the above topics. First of all, what’s the purpose of cruise control? If you want to go your maximum speed limit, then push your throttle all the way forward. I gave up on the game so many times because what I thought was a flaw was just cruise control enabled, until I figured it out.

Secondly, I know boost affects all directions and afterburner is straight forward. Why differentiate between the two? I most often want to use boost to race up to a distant vandal in a dog fight, but my joysticks are currently set up to use boost which doesn’t go beyond the speed limiter. So I need to Max the limiter but when I get close by I want the limiter in place. So I have to keep resetting it. Does afterburner go past the speed limiter?

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Cruise Control is needed for K/M and gamepad users.

Speed Limiter, limits your speed, afterburner won’t go past it.

Cruise Control has 1 main purposes. When flying mouse & keyboard it’s more or less essential if you don’t want to keep holding the W key. Trying to fly in formation without cruise control is… hard.

With a throttle, there is no real use for cruise control.

I did not even know afterburner was a thing?

Ah, OK. Well whoever made up the Thrustmaster profile, which is a great help, added it to the profile. But if your using the Thrustmaster you don’t need it. Yeah, I can see how the CC is needed for keyboard/mouse.

You should talk to @CaliJoshua he made the Warthog profile we use here, and is kinda the resident expert on joystick profiles.

I’ve managed to change the joystick profile to my liking. Pushing the top throttle tumb control forward now both resets my speed limiter to scm limit and toggles it off or on instead of engageing cruise control. That’s closest to what I wanted. Thanks.

Here’s another question. What’s the purpose of a throttle limiter compared to a speed limiter. Gsafe seems to take care of the only game reason you need to limit throttle.

I have a couple of preset throttle limits and mappings to manage them with my HOSAS setup. I often use a lower one for landing, and have the higher one for combat situations, as well as a reset back to SCM speed for general maneuvering.

Using a 30% or so throttle setting, the controls are a lot less responsive so you can use larger throws for landing without slamming into a wall or roof.

As already answered, cruise control is not needed if you have a throttle. I don’t even have it bound. It’s used regularly by m/kb users.

Afterburner is the old name for Boost. Boost simply amplifies the thruster power in whatever direction you’re giving inputs or amplifies your deceleration if you’re providing no inputs.

Spacebrake is just Boost to bring you to a stop, the difference being that Spacebrake “locks” you on your current vector while braking. In other words, if you’re flying straight ahead and you want to stop…Boost and Spacebrake do exactly the same thing. If you are trying to rapidly slow down while also in a turn…Boost will brake you while still allowing you to turn and Spacebrake will lock you in a straight line. By turn I don’t mean rotate…you can rotate with either…but your actual ship direction will be locked in a straight line when using Spacebrake.

As for speed limiter…I’m constantly turning it off and on and adjusting it for different situations. Fine throttle control is improved the lower it’s set at, where you put it in each situation is really intended to give you the throttle control you need and to limit unintentional overspeeding. We train our combat pilots to start at “double SCM” so they don’t get too fast in combat, with a key to turn the limiter off and on when they need extra speed. That’s because overspeeding is a common error that destroys combat geometry and it’s easy to forget with everything else they are processing in the heat of battle while learning. The better you get, the more you can work toward almost always having the limiter off.

A long time ago CC was used to overcome a bug in the game, but beyond that it is vestigial to a time when I was making all the hat switches the same across many HOTAS’s. At that time I had planned a dual joystick option, so this was also a part of that plan. Currently I removed them as primary states because I was having incidental engagements of them that caused me to have CC on when I was trying to stop. If you are using a WARTHOG I can share the unreleased version. If not and you want to remove it, this video shows you how. Thrustmaster TARGET (T.A.R.G.E.T) Tutorial - TWO JOYSTICKS IN ONE? - YouTube

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Thanks but I have it the way I like it now. Just didn’t know if there was some elite fighter pilot reason for having the CC.

Shield left and right are really only any good for size 3 shields right? Think I’ll retask them for requesting landing/liftoff permission and something else. I don’t really have the mental bandwidth to mess with shields even if my ship was big enough to have a size 3.

Shields are a critical adjustment on the Power Triangle now, for all ships. The direction only effects like you said size 3 and up, but in the future it will be on all shields.

I changed the triangle setting to max for the three power systems instead of increment, and if shield micromanageing becomes a thing for me I’ll reevaluate. But right now I’m looking forward to having some controller space for other commands. The less I have to use my keyboard the better.

The max power management I don’t believe was a setting when I made this, but is on the list of changes.

Hi Cali, thanks for sharing and great video.
Would you share the unreleased most recent setup that you mentioned please? Thank you <3

I only have it for the WARTHOG, but yes if that is the HOTAS you are using.

Yup, i own the Warthog Hotas, thank you.

What is pp_rebindkeys layout_CJ080621 for? Is it a star citizen profile because I’ve made my own after running that one and it’s a lot smaller. But I would think it would include your stuff as well as mine.

It activates the .xml that all the inputs are based on/keyboard inputs. The .fcf uses keyboard inputs that are emulated to the HOTAS buttons, thus the buttons show as keyboard inputs, but only if you are in the Keybindings/Advanced in Star Citizen will you see this. Otherwise you use an X Binding and the input shows as a button number when you are in the Joystick/HOTAS/Advanced in Star Citizen. Emulating keyboard inputs on the HOTAS allows for layers and the modifier, thus making any button able to perform two functions. If you don’t understand this you will need to watch this video Thrustmaster TARGET (T.A.R.G.E.T) Tutorial - TWO JOYSTICKS IN ONE? - YouTube, and make a .xml to match any keyboard changes.

The process is a bit complicated and a little technical. There are very specific reasons why each instruction in my installment video needs to be followed. I did not explain what each thing does because it would be even more boring and significantly longer. To make a profile you have to plan out each keyboard input, deconflict for any duplicates, make a .xml file to match, and then a .fcf that follows your layout.